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MISSION STATEMENT

VOLUNTEERS

INJURED BIRDS

MEDICAL TREATMENT

EDUCATIONAL BIRDS

CAGING

VETERINARIANS

YOUR BACKYARD

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

SANDHILL CRANES

BANDED RETURNS

WINGS " N" THINGS

OPERATION MIGRATION

DO NO HARM

 

 

 

 

 

TREATMENT OF INJURED BIRDS

 

At the treatment center the bird is evaluated.  Sometimes it is fed, or re-hydrated.  If the birds wing or leg is broken, they are wrapped until the bird can be seen by the doctor.  Birds are fragile and their bones are hollow, therefore the healing process can be quite difficult.  Rehabilitators have to be aware of the bird symptoms which are not  always easy to find.   The tiniest hole made by a cat bite can be deadly.  Broken and dislocated wings must be handled very carefully so as to not aggravate the injury.  All of the cages must be soft sided as to not further injure the feathers of the bird.

Surgeries and treatments for birds are similar to humans.  Fractures can be pinned and if done correctly, a bird can be released.  Lead poisoning and other toxins are treated with human drugs.  Fluids are given in the same way as humans.

After a bird is treated, they cannot be released into the wild until we know that they can kill their own food, (if a predator) and fly again, depending on the injury.  Most of our cages have mouse liners, which means live food can be dropped in, and the raptor must learn to kill on its own again.  Broken wings have to be in perfect condition.  Flight cages help a bird practice flying.  All birds need time to acclimate to the weather changes.  The birds must be waterproof before they can be released.  A bird that is not waterproof would get cold and not be able to control its body temperature.

The birds at the Feather are housed in pens of treated lumber with vinyl coated wire.  All of the cages have hiding places for them.  Each bird has it's own bathing and drinking water and fresh mice and rats are fed daily to the raptors.  A bird just out of surgery is kept quiet in a small cage for a couple of weeks, then moved to a bit larger cage to exercise a bit, then on to a larger cage yet to fly and find their own food.  (Check out our caging page to see the different size cages.)

As the bird acclimates to the weather and the cage it's physical condition returns to normal.  Flying builds muscle. The more they fly the more they want to get away.  They seem to tell you when they are ready to go.

All of the birds released from the Feather carry U.S. Fish and Wildlife bands.   We also band songbirds but most of our recoveries are raptors.  (See Raptor Banding in special section.)

 

 

 

All Photos, Graphics & Content Copyright 2002 Fisher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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